Sonnet XLIII. TURBO TAX How do I love thee? Let me count the ways… {by sarah nean bruce}

Sonnet XLIII: Turbo Tax How Do I love thee? Let me count the ways by sarah nean bruce {TTax Image}

XLIII. TURBO TAX
“How do I love thee?
Let me count the ways…”

by sarah nean bruce 2011

Turbo Tax: How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.

I love thee for your step-by-step guidance, finding me every credit I deserve, with the depth and breadth and height my maximum refund can reach.

I love thee to the level of maximizing my deductions, for automatically checking my information, for double-checking for accuracy as I go, and for your Audit Risk Meter.

I love thee freely, with 5 federal e-files, and 1 state download.

I love thee purely, for allowing me to import financial data including W-2s, investment and mortgage, from Quicken and Quickbooks and my prior year tax data.

I love thee with a passion when you give me live answers online from Turbo Tax experts and other Turbo Tax Users!

I love thee with a love of searching over 350 deductions and credits, and showing me which I qualify for.

I love thee with the breath, smiles, tears, of all my life because you cover me for any changes in my life.

And, I shall but love thee better after tax season with extra guidance for investments, rental properties, and refinancing.

~*~
;-)
P.S. this is my update & adaptation of SONNET #43, FROM THE PORTUGUESE By Elizabeth Barrett Browning.
~*~

Here is the beautiful ORIGINAL
How Do I Love Thee? Let me count the ways (Sonnet 43)

by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of being and ideal grace.
I love thee to the level of every day's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
I love thee freely, as men strive for right.
I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

WIKIPEDIA – AUTHOR BACKGROUND: Born in 1806 at Coxhoe Hall, Durham, England, Elizabeth Barrett, was an English poet of the Romantic Movement. In 1826 Elizabeth anonymously published her collection An Essay on Mind and Other Poems. in 1844 produced a collection entitled simply Poems. This volume gained the attention of poet Robert Browning, whose work Elizabeth had praised in one of her poems, and he wrote her a letter. Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth and Robert, who was six years her junior, exchanged 574 letters over the next twenty months. Immortalized in 1930 in the play The Barretts of Wimpole Street, by Rudolf Besier (1878-1942), their romance was bitterly opposed by her father, who did not want any of his children to marry. In 1846, the couple eloped and settled in Florence, Italy, where Elizabeth’s health improved and she bore a son, Robert Wideman Browning. Her father never spoke to her again. Elizabeth’s Sonnets from the Portuguese, dedicated to her husband and written in secret before her marriage, was published in 1850. Critics generally consider the Sonnets—one of the most widely known collections of love lyrics in English—to be her best work. Admirers have compared her imagery to Shakespeare and her use of the Italian form to Petrarch.

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2 responses to “Sonnet XLIII. TURBO TAX How do I love thee? Let me count the ways… {by sarah nean bruce}

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